Freedom Tree

(2020)







Freedom Tree (2020)
Ceramic, Glazes, Galvanised and Stainless Steel, Reflective Tape
700cm x 450cm
Freedom Tree (2020), Vertical Animal, Sculpture on the Cliffs, Hermanus
Freedom Tree (2020), Vertical Animal, Sculpture on the Cliffs, Hermanus
Freedom Tree (2020), Vertical Animal, Sculpture on the Cliffs, Hermanus
Freedom Tree (2020), Vertical Animal, Sculpture on the Cliffs, Hermanus
Freedom Tree (2020), Vertical Animal, Sculpture on the Cliffs, Hermanus

Freedom Tree (2020), Vertical Animal, Sculpture on the Cliffs, Hermanus
Freedom Tree (2020), Vertical Animal, Sculpture on the Cliffs, Hermanus
Freedom Tree (2020), Vertical Animal, Sculpture on the Cliffs, Hermanus
Freedom Tree (2020), Vertical Animal, Sculpture on the Cliffs, Hermanus
Freedom Tree (2020), Vertical Animal, Sculpture on the Cliffs, Hermanus


Photographer: Fiona Barclay Smith

This work was installed for Fynarts, Sculpture in the Cliffs, Vertical Animal, 2020.
Curated by Gavin Younge

View Catalogue  

The work is inspired and a kind of homage to Alexander Calder’s Mobiles. The base is sunk into the ground, and weighted by 900kg of concrete and designed to withstand up to 110 km/h winds. The axis is 4m high galvanised steel and the steel cross bar is 7m. The weights of each bird and connectors affect balance.

The stability aspect of the work is designed to withstand up to 110 km/h winds. We discovered the high coastal wind while not disturbing the stability created friction, after the first night, in the stainless steel connectors and (1,5mm) cable. These cables, normally used in fishing of 300 kg weight tuna, had to be replaced by even stronger connectors and cabling used in yachting. These have proved so far to withstand and work with the dynamic wind speeds and currents of this coastal site.

The steel back of the birds create a flat silhouette with a red X, which refers to the The Red Data Book of Birds. The ‘front’ represents a visual interpretation of bird like forms, in ceramic. The distinction of the two different sides create a gap or pause meant to draw attention to the gap between human and nature. Through the motion of the wind and continuous rotation individually as well as around the main axis, the birds are moving between the two states of invisibility and visibility, present and absent.

The show is called “vertical animal” and is open until June 2021. You are welcome to view more about the exhibition in my news blog Breaking Ground.

To purchase Freedom Tree (2020), please contact Chantel at Fynarts Hermanus